Just a Bread Crumb

Lotsa Carbs


What I Wish My Christian (and Atheist and Generally Non-Jewish) Friends Knew about Judaism Vol. 1
Star of David
morzsa
What I Wish My Christian (and Atheist and Generally Non-Jewish) Friends Knew about Judaism Vol. 1 is dealing with a very important topic. That is, burgers. As a brief introduction to Jewish dietary laws, also known as Kashrut, I'd like to mention two big no-no's: one is pork, the other is eating milk and meat together. Various people observe this to different levels, like keeping 6 hours between eating meat and dairy. These people usually only eat kosher meat and kosher dairy anyway.

I'm not that strict with my observance of the kashrut, but meat and daily won't mix in the same meal for me. It just won't.

Just recently during my trip to Hungary, I ended up stopping at the fast food chain with the scary clown. The following conversation happened in Hungarian (and slightly paraphrased, as it was weeks ago).

Fast Food Worker with a Dolphin Tattoo on Her Hand: Hi, how can I help you?
Me: Hi, I'd like two hamburgers please.
FFWWADTOHH: Would you like cheeseburgers instead, they cost the same.
Me: No, thank you.
FFWWADTOHH: Would you like that in a meal with a small drink and fries.
Me: Sure, why not.
FFWWADTOHH: I can only get you hamburgers in meals if it's a Happy Meal.
Me: Uhm, do I look like someone who needs plastic toys? No Happy Meal, please.
FFWWADTOHH: So would you like to have a cheeseburger meal instead?
Me: No, no cheeseburger, please.
FFWWADTOHH: But we don't have hamburger meals.
Me: You know what? I'd like a cheeseburger meal, no cheese in the cheeseburger and a hamburger.
FFWWADTOHH: I never had a customer who didn't want cheese in their cheeseburger.
Me: ...



So rule number 2 when it comes to kashrut: we don't mix dairy with meat. And if you want to combine it with rule number 1: We don't eat cheeseburgers with bacon. Well, that's just a general rule, and I can't speak for other Jews who might or might not keep kosher.

So what else? G-d apparently has an issue with rabbit stew and seafood pizza, because hares and rabbits, juts like seafood (anything but scaled fish) are also not kosher. Really, any carnivorous animal isn't. But a safe bet: Coca Cola and Heinz ketchup in plastic bottles are kosher. So is Nutella sold in North America (and in Israel, of course). So fries made from scratch with Heinz ketchup and a coke with a jar of Nutella for dessert is a safe bet to feed your Jewish guest.

Or you can feed them hamburgers. No cheese. :)

My G-d
Star of David
morzsa

There is a song I really like that I was just reminded of by the wonderful Hope Anne

I have written about two things here frequesntly: my struggle with my faith (or lack thereof) and Harel Skaat. Now there  is a song that I haven't listened to for a long long time. The primary reason for that is that it makes me sad, reminding me of something I lack. And something that I desperately want to have. If it makes any sense.




I made an attempt to translate this song. You must remember that my Hebrew is still lacking and well, sometimes the original doesn't make sense to me.  Corrections are welcome!


A Few of My Favourite Things (2011 edition)
Monkeys
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OK, so I'm not original, okay? I stole this from the wonderful @Cestovatelka and the talented @NVPhotography (whose idea for an it gets better video I'm still not sure I understand).
Most of these photos are stolen from the Internet. Some used with permission.
These are things I love, I am obsessed with or I am passionate about, other than my family. In a very random order.

Religions, and items to go with them, like these Sunday School reward cards. Religions are fascinating. Faith is something I envy in people who actually can believe.

Urban fantasy. This picture really has nothing to do with anything, but it gives out urban fantasy feelings. I especially like Sergei Lukyanenko's Night watch and its sequels.
More of my favourite things. You want to see it!Collapse )

Újfent megállapítom...
Perspective
morzsa
...hogy az emberek nagy része hülye. Keverik a szezont a fazonnal, és amikor a hülyeségükre rávilágítanak, témához nem tartozó dolgokkal mosakszanak.

Pedig egyszerűbb lenne gondolkozni, mielőtt beszélünk.

Pay It Forward
Perspective
morzsa
A játékszabály.

Pay It Forward: I will send a handmade gift to the first 5people who leave a comment on the above post. I don't yet know what that gift will be, but you will receive it within 365 days. The only thing you have to do in return is "pay it forward" by making a similar agreement on your blog.

Add tovább! Az első öt embernek, aki hozzászólást hagy a fenti bejegyzésen, küldök egy kézzel készített ajándékot. Még nem tudom mit, de 365 napon belül megkapod! Az egyetlen dolog, mait meg kell tenned, hogy tovább adod a lehetőséget: ezt bemásolva a blogodba.

My kids' absolute fave video!
Star of David
morzsa

The words in EnglishCollapse )

Quo Vadis?
Perspective
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To Karen

Today I was taking a small trip down to the little shop that caters to patients at the hospital, and I found a bunch of silicone bracelets for sale. After laughing at the poorly made fake LIVESTRONG bracelets I found some others that were not so poorly made and were somewhat inspiring, among them a bunch of Latin ones. While my Latin is rather poor, I picked up the meaning of a few, among which were the Quo Vadis bracelets.

Quo Vadis is often translated as "Where are we headed?" while the actual meaning is more like "Where do you go?" or "Whither goest thou?"

Quo vadis? Whither goest thou? This question is dating back to the Apocrypha, when Peter fleeing Rome on the Via Appia met Jesus Christ. Peter asked the Lord, "Domine, quo vadis?" Lord, where are you going? Christ's answer was simple: "I go into Rome to be crucified." Peter then realised the wrongness of his ways (quite literally) and returned to Rome where he was soon crucified upside down.

The phrase is also commonly associated with John 16:5. 5  But now I go my way to him that sent me; and none of you asketh me, Whither goest thou? (KJV)

Many times when I roam the corridors of the hospital or college, friends will stop me and ask me, "Where are you going?" If my destination isn't out of the way for them, they often offer to accompany me on my journey, be it short or long. They join me, walk with me, offering companionship on a path that leads me to my goal, even if it means a little detour for them. We are friends, we walk the road of life together, helping and entertaining each other. Sometimes when I have trouble with a threshold or some other not quite disabled friendly thing, they help me get over them. They help me to make them stepping stones instead of stumbling blocks.

Sometimes when I tell them that I'm planning to go to the pond or out to some other dangerous place, they stop me. They don't let me get into trouble, because they are my friends. They wouldn't let me stray from the path I am supposed to safely walk on. But sometimes, unfortunately, they would decide to go with me to dangerous areas, follow me, or even worse, ask me to go with them, and often, I'm foolish enough to follow.

Quo vadis? Whither goest thou? It is a question I ask myself many times when making decisions. It is a lot easier to remember to ask it and honestly answer when I am alone. I have to remember, however, that even when I am with someone else I am responsible for my own choices, for my own life. I can choose to follow or I can choose to stick to my itinerary. I draw the map of my life, I do the road plan, I pick the paths. And that is a hard job. Sometimes a road seems easy and paved, comfortable and wide, but I have to ask myself where I am heading and if the road will take me there.

Quo vadis? Whither goest thou? Moving to Utah when I was 18 I learnt early on that if I wanted to go to the Canyons to run and enjoy nature I couldn't take I-15, the nice, wide and paved road, because it wasn't taking me to the canyons. If I wanted to go to Provo I-15 was a good choice. If I wanted to go to the Canyons, it wasn't. Everything depended on where I wante dto be and what choices I made.

Choices and decisions are hard things to make. As I grow older I find it they are becoming harder. There is less and less guidance from loving parents and teachers and more and more responsibility. Nowadays I find that I am no longer just responsible for myself, but I often have to help my children make their own decisions. One of the things that influences them the most is them seeing my choices. They follow my example for now, so I have to be extra careful about where I go.

So every day I ask myself, "Quo vadis, Derek?" And I can only hope that the answer is home.




This was originally written on 5 August 2005. I just recently rediscovered this entry from poeticceadsearc. Today I stand here, asking the same question from myself, looking for the answers in my past and present.

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Perspective
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JAIL!

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